essa extra

essa extra

Essa extra
Linked Learning: Under ESSA, assessments must include measures that assess higher-order thinking skills and understanding and may be partially delivered in the form of portfolios, projects, or extended-performance tasks.
Personalized learning requires those working in schools to rethink the ways they teach and support students in their learning.

Essa extra
Remember, state plans (now all submitted to the US Department of Education) are only the first step. The implementation of these plans at the level of the district and school and the tools, resources and guidance provided by the state will be crucial to ensuring these plans support well-rounded student success in the manner they intend.
The ESSA law has 10 Titles (sections), three of which are very important for afterschool:

Essa extra
Jason Botel, who is serving as the acting assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education, told state chiefs in a June 28 letter that, if they’re ready to start including the information sooner, they should go ahead and do so in the 2017-18 school year. States that aren’t should instead use their report cards to explain how they plan to meet the requirement next year, Botel said.
“This requirement is one of the most important levers we have in ESSA to make progress on the pernicious problem of resource inequities,” King said.

Under ESSA’s weighted student funding pilot program, up to fifty districts can participate initially, with unlimited national expansion permitted for the 2019–20 school year. Districts can consolidate all of their federal Title I and II dollars, as well as other funding at various levels, into one weighted formula for schools. To participate, districts have to submit an application to the U.S. Department of Education, demonstrate annual compliance with certain requirements, and issue yearly reports on spending.
The department can also ensure that its new “supplement, not supplant” regulations do not throw a monkey wrench into the pilot program. Districts that adequately weight low-income students should meet the requirements of the regulations that are ultimately issued, even though the weight is funded through a combination of federal, state, and local dollars. That may mean adjusting the draft regulations that the department presented during the negotiated rulemaking process.

Title I also sets forth the requirements for LEA Plans in Section 1112. It states that an LEA must develop a plan in “timely and meaningful consultation” with teachers, specialized instructional support personnel, paraprofessionals, other appropriate school personnel, and parents. Some of these plans will directly impact compensation, such as additional pay to work in hard-to-staff schools, while others may be more indirect such as pay for extended work days.
CBMA has the following compensation-related resources that can assist affiliates in negotiating or advocating for compensation systems based on professional growth and advancement and countering the arguments that pay based on student test scores is effective.

References:

http://www.afterschoolalliance.org/policyesealegoverview.cfm
http://mobile.edweek.org/c.jsp?cid=25920011&item=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.edweek.org%2Fv1%2Fblogs%2F49%2F%3Fuuid%3D72798
http://fordhaminstitute.org/national/commentary/follow-money-essas-weighted-student-funding-pilots
http://myschoolmyvoice.nea.org/educators/performance-based-compensation-essa/
http://examples.yourdictionary.com/essay-examples.html